The Erosion of the Gospel


From The Cambridge Declaration:

Sola Gratia: The Erosion of the Gospel

Unwarranted confidence in human ability is a product of fallen human nature. This false confidence now fills the evangelical world; from the self-esteem gospel, to the health and wealth gospel, from those who have transformed the gospel into a product to be sold and sinners into consumers who want to buy, to others who treat Christian faith as being true simply because it works. This silences the doctrine of justification regardless of the official commitments of our churches.

God’s grace in Christ is not merely necessary but is the sole efficient cause of salvation. We confess that human beings are born spiritually dead and are incapable even of cooperating with regenerating grace.

Thesis Three: Sola Gratia

We reaffirm that in salvation we are rescued from God’s wrath by his grace alone. It is the supernatural work of the Holy Spirit that brings us to Christ by releasing us from our bondage to sin and raising us from spiritual death to spiritual life.

We deny that salvation is in any sense a human work. Human methods, techniques or strategies by themselves cannot accomplish this transformation. Faith is not produced by our unregenerated human nature.

Ligonier Archives: Inquiring About Christianity


Below is a collection of resources from the archives of Ligonier Ministries for those inquiring about Christianity.

Inquiring About Christianity:  Serious answers for serious inquirers. Who is Jesus and what did He do? Can I know truth? What is the gospel and why is it good news?

Wounded for Our Transgressions by W. Robert Godfrey

Forgive Us Our Trespasses by Philip Ryken

An Everlasting Love: The Love of God by John MacArthur

Who Is Jesus? by John MacArthur

Good News in a Fallen World by Joni Eareckson Tada

The Nature of Saving Faith by Sinclair Ferguson

What Is the Standard of Truth? by R.C. Sproul

Exchanging the Truth for a Lie by R.C. Sproul

The Holiness of God with Dr. R.C. Sproul

Understanding the Gospel with Dr. R.C. Sproul

More resources available here.

Human Inability


Well, it’s Monday! – and normally that would mean a little something from Matthew Henry. However, I have decided to share with you a classic essay from another one of my favorites – Charles Spurgeon.

No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him. John 6:44

“Coming to Christ” is a very common phrase in Holy Scripture. It is used to express those acts of the soul wherein, leaving at once our self-righteousness, and our sins, we fly unto the Lord Jesus Christ, and receive his righteousness to be our covering, and his blood to be our atonement. Coming to Christ, then, embraces in it repentance, self-negation, and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, and it sums within itself all those things which are the necessary attendants of these great states of heart, such as the belief of the truth, earnestness of prayer to God, the submission of the soul to the precepts of God’s gospel, and all those things which accompany the dawn of salvation in the soul. Coming to Christ is just the one essential thing for a sinner’s salvation. He that cometh not to Christ, do what he may, or think what he may, is yet in “the gall of bitterness and in the bonds of iniquity.” Coming to Christ is the very first effect of regeneration. No sooner is the soul quickened than it at once discovers its lost estate, is horrified thereat, looks out for a refuge, and believing Christ to be a suitable one, flies to him and reposes in him. Where there is not this coming to Christ, it is certain that there is as yet no quickening; where there is no quickening, the soul is dead in trespasses and sins, and being dead it cannot enter into the kingdom of heaven. We have before us now an announcement very startling, some say very obnoxious. Coming to Christ, though described by some people as being the very easiest thing in all the world, is in our text declared to be a thing utterly and entirely impossible to any man, unless the Father shall draw him to Christ. It shall be our business, then, to enlarge upon this declaration. We doubt not that it will always be offensive to carnal nature, but, nevertheless, the offending of human nature is sometimes the first step towards bringing it to bow itself before God. And if this be the effect of a painful process, we can forget the pain and rejoice in the glorious consequences. continue reading

Charles Spurgeon, Human Inability, 1858