“Quote of the Day”

…brought to you by Arthur Walkington (A.W.) Pink:

A spiritual and saving knowledge of God is the greatest need of every human creature. The foundation of all true knowledge of God must be a clear mental apprehension of His perfections as revealed in Holy Scripture. An unknown God can neither be trusted, served nor worshipped. Something more than a theoretical knowledge of God is needed by us. God is only truly known in the soul as we yield ourselves to Him, submit to His authority, and regulate all the details of our lives by His holy precepts and commandments.

A.W. Pink The Attributes of God pg. 7-8

Human Inability

Well, it’s Monday! – and normally that would mean a little something from Matthew Henry. However, I have decided to share with you a classic essay from another one of my favorites – Charles Spurgeon.

No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him. John 6:44

“Coming to Christ” is a very common phrase in Holy Scripture. It is used to express those acts of the soul wherein, leaving at once our self-righteousness, and our sins, we fly unto the Lord Jesus Christ, and receive his righteousness to be our covering, and his blood to be our atonement. Coming to Christ, then, embraces in it repentance, self-negation, and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, and it sums within itself all those things which are the necessary attendants of these great states of heart, such as the belief of the truth, earnestness of prayer to God, the submission of the soul to the precepts of God’s gospel, and all those things which accompany the dawn of salvation in the soul. Coming to Christ is just the one essential thing for a sinner’s salvation. He that cometh not to Christ, do what he may, or think what he may, is yet in “the gall of bitterness and in the bonds of iniquity.” Coming to Christ is the very first effect of regeneration. No sooner is the soul quickened than it at once discovers its lost estate, is horrified thereat, looks out for a refuge, and believing Christ to be a suitable one, flies to him and reposes in him. Where there is not this coming to Christ, it is certain that there is as yet no quickening; where there is no quickening, the soul is dead in trespasses and sins, and being dead it cannot enter into the kingdom of heaven. We have before us now an announcement very startling, some say very obnoxious. Coming to Christ, though described by some people as being the very easiest thing in all the world, is in our text declared to be a thing utterly and entirely impossible to any man, unless the Father shall draw him to Christ. It shall be our business, then, to enlarge upon this declaration. We doubt not that it will always be offensive to carnal nature, but, nevertheless, the offending of human nature is sometimes the first step towards bringing it to bow itself before God. And if this be the effect of a painful process, we can forget the pain and rejoice in the glorious consequences. continue reading

Charles Spurgeon, Human Inability, 1858

Glorify God by Contending for His Word

I enjoy the writings of Thomas Watson (c. 1620—1686, English, non-conformist, Puritan preacher and author) and today I came across this devotion while reading Glorifying God.

Contend by making a statement, for “all scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work” (2 Timothy 3:16). Though we should not possess argumentative attitudes and hearts, we ought to be willing to stand firm and contend for the word of God. This jewel, God’s word, is too precious to be parted with. The scripture is surrounded by enemies; heretics fight against it. We must therefore “contend for the faith which was once delivered to the saints” (Jude 3). The scripture is our book of evidence for heaven. Shall we part with our proof? The saints of old were both advocates and martyrs for truth; they would hold fast to the scriptures, even though they knew they could lose their lives for that stand.

Emphasis mine.