Matthew Henry’s Method for Prayer

Having ascribed glory to God, which is his due, Psalm 29:2 we must next take shame to ourselves, which is our due, and humble ourselves before him in the sense of our own sinfulness and vileness; and herein also we must give glory to him, Joshua 7:19 as our Judge, by whom we deserve to be condemned, and yet hope, through Christ, to be acquitted and absolved.

In this part of our work, we must acknowledge the great reason we have to lie very low before God and to be ashamed of ourselves when we come into his presence and to be afraid of his wrath, having made ourselves both odious to his holiness and obnoxious to his justice.

 

Pray the Bible?

It is made our duty and prescribed as a remedy against disquieting care, that in everything, by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, we should make our requests known to God. And it is part of the Parrhsia, the boldness, the liberty of speech (so the word signifies), which is allowed us in our access to God, that we may be particular in opening our case and seeking to him for relief; that, according as the sore and the grief is, accordingly the prayer and the supplication may be by any man. Not that God needs to be particularly informed of our condition, he knows it better than we ourselves do, and our souls too in our adversity; but it is his will that we should thus acknowledge him in all our ways and wait upon him for the direction of every step, not prescribing, but subscribing to infinite wisdom, humbly showing him our wants, burdens, and desires, and then referring ourselves to him, to do for us as he knows fit.

Matthew Henry, Method for Prayer

Publisher Description:

Resorting to a more scriptural pattern of prayer may be a simple (but profound) answer to many problems in our practice of prayer. There are a number of reasons that could be given as to why Christians should “Pray the Bible,” but the ones below combine to make a rather convincing argument:

  • Praying scripturally will teach us what prayer is, even while we do it.
  • It will correct “shopping list” views of prayer which abound in the Christian community.
  • It will begin to solve in our own minds the question of “unanswered prayer.”
  • It will remind us of just how much there is to pray about day by day.
  • It will teach us of the extreme urgency of prayer.
  • It will return proportion to prayers long on petition, but short on adoration, confession, and thanksgiving.
  • It will instruct us how best to pray for ministers, missionaries, and one another.
  • It will show us the proper way to approach God in prayer.
  • It will remind us of the good things that God does for us (which we, more often than not, take for granted).
  • It will remind us to always give thanks to God (which, paradoxically, is so important for our own assurance of His faithfulness in answering prayer).
  • It will begin to engrave in our minds biblical patterns of thought which can help immunize us from the enticing folly of the world’s view of life.
  • It will force us to rehearse the solemn warnings and precious promises of God (which will do eternal good to our souls).
  • It will move us from our inherent man-centeredness in prayer to a biblical, God-centered way of praying.

The aim of the online publication of this “old-made-new” monograph is to assist and encourage modern Christians in both public and private prayer. Surely we all recognize that the Church of our day, at least in the West, is weak in the way of prayer. Few of us, perhaps, understand what prayer really is. We do not pray often. We do not pray with scriptural proportion, nor does our prayer much reflect the language and thought of the Bible. We do not pray fervently. Although we claim otherwise, maybe we really do not believe in prayer!

For those who are called upon to lead the Church in public prayer, or who simply desire to be more faithful and competent in their own private petitions, a scriptural manner of praying provides the order, proportion, and variety which should characterize all our prayers. We have aimed to provide users with a number of helps to assist in achieving this end. The core of the website is the entire text of Matthew Henry’s A Method for Prayer. Reading and re-reading through it will train the Christian in the use of biblical truth and language in prayer.

 

Matthew Henry Monday

Every Monday ws harbor likes to dedicate a post to Matthew Henry. Henry (10/18/1662 – 06/22/1714) was a commentator on the Bible and Presbyterian minister of the Gospel. We recommend his works for devotional purposes.

I must give honor to the three persons in the Godhead distinctly, to the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, that great and sacred Name into which I was baptized and in which I assemble for religious worship, in communion with the universal church.

I pay my homage to three that testify in heaven: the Father, the Word, and the Holy Spirit; for these three are one. 1 John 5:7 (KJV)

I adore you, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, Matthew 11:25 (ESV) and the eternal Word, who was in the beginning with God and was God, through him all things were made, and without him was not any thing made that was made; John 1:1-3 (ESV) and who in the fullness of time, Galatians 4:4 (ESV) became flesh and dwelt among us and showed his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth. John 1:14 (ESV)

And since it is the will of God that all men should honor the Son, just as they honor the Father, John 5:23 (ESV) I adore him as the radiance of his Father’s glory and the exact imprint of his nature; Hebrews 1:3 (ESV) herein joining with the angels of God, who were all bidden to worship him. Hebrews 1:6 (ESV)

I pay homage to the exalted Redeemer, who is the faithful witness, the firstborn of the dead, and the ruler of the kings of the earth, Revelation 1:5 (ESV) confessing that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. Philippians 2:11 (ESV)

I also worship the Holy Spirit, the Helper, whom the Son has sent from the Father, even the Spirit of truth, who proceeds from the Father, John 15:26 (ESV) and who is sent to teach me all things and to bring all things to my remembrance; John 14:26 (ESV) who indited the Scriptures, holy men of God writing them as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit. 2 Peter 1:21 (ESV)

Matthew Henry, Method for Prayer

Matthew Henry Monday

Every Monday ws harbor likes to dedicate a post to Matthew Henry. Nonconformist Henry (10/18/1662 – 06/22/1714) was a commentator on the Bible and Presbyterian minister of the Gospel. We recommend his works for devotional purposes.

To sanctify my nature, to plant in me all holy principles and dispositions, and to increase every grace in me.

Now may the God of peace himself sanctify me completely, and may my whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of my Lord Jesus Christ. He who calls me is faithful; he will surely do it.

Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me. Cast me not away from your presence, and take not your Holy Spirit away from me. Restore to me the joy of your salvation, and uphold me with a willing spirit.

Write your law on my heart and put it within me, that I may be a letter from Christ, written by the Spirit of the living God, not on a tablet of stone but on a tablet of human heart; that the law of my God being in my heart, none of my steps may slip; and that I may delight to do your will, O God; may delight in the law of God in my inner being.

O that I may become obedient from the heart to the standard of teaching to which I desire to be committed, as into a mold, that my whole soul may be leavened by it; and that I may not be conformed to this world, but transformed by the renewal of my mind; may not be conformed to the passions of my former ignorance, but as an obedient child, may be holy in all my conduct, as he who called me is holy.

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