Why It’s Essential


Put simply, the doctrine of inerrancy is the belief that the Bible is true.

Of course, there is much more to say about the definition than this. Countless books have been written explaining, defining, and defending this doctrine, not to mention the affirmations and denials of the 1978 Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy. But the gist of inerrancy is the belief that the Bible is God’s Word and that when God speaks, He speaks truth. Thus, belief in inerrancy is the conviction that whatever the Bible affirms is accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

Why It’s Essential by Michael Kruger

“Doubting on your part…


does not constitute a crisis of faith on mine.” Article from Carl Trueman, August 2011.

I am sorry that you can no longer believe the simple catechetical faith that you were once taught; I am sorry that the Bible seems like little more than a confused mish-mash of contradictory myths and endlessly deferred meaning.  But that you struggle with doubts does not mean that those who do not struggle in the same way are simply weak-minded, in denial or bare-faced liars.  Nor, more importantly, does the mere fact that you have doubts mean that those doubts are necessarily legitimate and well-grounded.  Doubting on your part does not constitute a crisis of faith on mine. more

Today at Pyromaniacs


To stay with the theme of inerrancy, Dan Phillips has some good words to share.

This all brings us to the Charismatic issue. The great achievement of modern Charismaticism is to dupe so many otherwise-fine people into letting Charismatics carve a niche for themselves where they can both promote themselves and avoid accountability. Or, put another way, both to canonize and sanctify their personal experiences and claims and to avoid testing of any sort.

One of these ways is that they will ostensibly quote God, some “word from the Lord” — but then, when challenged, hurry to say “That’s just for me!”

But is that option open? They have dared to claim to quote God. They have had the breath-taking, astonishing hubris to position themselves as mediators of revelation — claiming that God said words to them, words they now convey to you and to me.

Can that be a private affair? If so, too late now: they’ve spoken. They’ve claimed to speak God’s words!

So now I am indeed obligated. Their word obligates me. I cannot escape. (Nor can they, though they try.)

You see, if what they speak is a word of God, I am morally obligated to believe it. It doesn’t matter what the content is: a word from God has God’s authority, and “an authoritative word is one that imposes obligations on those who hear.” Well, I hear. What is my obligation?

If it is God’s word, I am obligated to believe it. And if it is not, I am obligated to rebuke and expose them as false prophets. more